Posts Tagged ‘Written by Dion Norman’

HEAT MUSIC ANALYSIS FEATURE: Mystikal Pays Homage To The Godfather of Soul with single, Hit Me

Friday, August 15th, 2014

Mystikal Pays Homage To The Godfather of Soul with single, Hit Me

Elements of hip hop represent a synthesis at its best. The way of life we love to bask in is a scaffold starting with archetypical musicians that were born in the 19th and 20th century. Although naysayers sometimes attempt to shun the foundational fathers of African American urban music, it’s merely an impossibility to separate the model embedded within us from the earliest soul and funk records.
James Brown, an American icon and trendsetter truly earned his moniker, “The Godfather Of Soul”.
Years later below the Mason-Dixon Line, New Orleans gave birth to “The Black Prince Of The South”.
So what’s the point?
The energy level first seen in our legendary superstar Brown manifested within “the man right chea”: Mystikal. His unique voice accompanied by New Orleans heavyweight producers Cise (Precise) and KLC fused smoothly with his repetitive ability to leave listeners and audiences in awe with catchy, comical tongue-twisting lyrics.
After years of success starting with Big Boy Records and No Limit Records, Mystikal is back on the scene.
So what’s this article about?
Mystikal’s ability to not only indirectly emulate the “Godfather of Soul” while still maintaining his uniqueness and originality, but his accountability as a creative. If one is really a hip hop connoisseur, then he will always pay homage to the roots of his craft.
Mystikal does a great job in representing and honoring the late James Brown with a KLC produced single, “Hit Me,” earning him a spot on the Rolling Stone Top 100 songs list of 2013.
The Heat Magazine wanted to point out this foreshadowing single as the world gets a closer look at the life of James Brown in the newly released blockbuster film, Get On Up. Be sure to check out the film and educate yourself on Brown who was a gem in American Music.
Check out Mystikal on Hit Me with the link below:
Mystikal-Hit Me
http://mixmatters.com/songs/mystikal:-hit-me

Is this James Brown reincarnated? Well James Brown did say he can “Dig Rappin'”

Bring An Innocent Man Home: Free Mac (No Limit Rap Icon)

Wednesday, July 23rd, 2014

The Heat Magazine wanted to update you on the latest information concerning American rap icon Mac.
McKinley Phipps (Mac) reached high levels of success while signed to Master P’s No Limit Records.
Things went awry leading to his unlawful incarceration and conviction in 2001. Since then, Mac’s family and support system have fought endlessly to exonerate him. Although it may seem mundane because the words “Free This One” or “Free That One” or often utilized out of context, Mac is an innocent man.
Mac wants the family of the victim to know that he did not commit the crime. The Heat Magazine recently discovered new ways that supporters can assist in the liberation of Mac. “Bring Mac Home”, is a website where one can make a donation. Each donation is a contribution towards Mac’s legal fund. For more information, visit http://www.youcaring.com/other/bring-mac-home-/152427
Additionally, Mac “The Lost Tapes” is available online. Therefore, each purchase helps Mac. Download here:
https://itunes.apple.com/us/album/the-lost-tapes/id835018108
In an effort to “bring an innocent man home”, The Heat Magazine wanted to make our readers aware. Free Mac!

Fiend Performing Live In Birmingham On 4th Of July

Tuesday, July 1st, 2014

An all-black party will take place on the fourth of July featuring Fiend aka International Jones. Skreg, Sunny Blakk and View Mobb will also perform. Doors open at 8 p.m. The venue is located at 2726 Pearson Avenue. For more information follow Fiend on twitter at https://twitter.com/FIEND4DAMONEY or call Reggi at 205-240-1374. The Heat Magazine wanted our Alabama readers and surrounding areas to be aware of this event. Capital F.I. says, “I’m performing all my hits.” Feel free to leave a comment if you catch the power-packed performance by the world-renowned rap star from New Orleans.

Mia X Unveils New Restaurant in New Orleans East

Tuesday, July 1st, 2014

Wisdom from your grandmother can always calm the beast and ease the pain. Lately, the iconic female rap star Mia X, has been busy with her “TeamWhipDemPots” movement. Ranging from her self-written cookbook “Things My Grandma Told Me, Things My Grandma Showed Me” to the newly found restaurant/bar “Starz and Food and Spirits and TeamWhipDemPots” located at 10711 Chef Menteur Highway in New Orleans, Mama Mia is providing an atmosphere that accentuates the heart of New Orleans culture. Be sure to stop by during Essence Festival if you’re coming in town to enjoy the excitement. The Heat Magazine wanted our readers to be in the know because Mia X is on the brink of something great in the Crescent City. For more information, follow Mia X on twitter at https://twitter.com/TheRealMiaX.

Heat Exclusive: New Orleans Gives Birth To Female Rap Artist G Baby

Saturday, January 18th, 2014

 

 

 

In life, we are often blessed with one great talent per family. Other times, the lineage reproduces itself. In New Orleans, a city rich in musical and cultural history, it gives birth to several creatives. Particularly, The Heat Magazine is honored to share the story of “G Baby” with our readers. She represents and continues a musical legacy started by her father, Warren Mayes. Mayes, a New Orleans rap pioneer and club promoter, was instrumental in the development of the hip hop and bounce scene in New Orleans. Years later, the world is blessed to hear from “daddy’s little girl.”

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The Heat Magazine: How long have you been rapping?

G Baby: I started at the age of 13.

The Heat Magazine: What type of artists inspire you?

G Baby: My inspiration comes from my father Warren Mayes who was known as a legend of bounce music. His number 1 hit record, “Get It Girl” in the early 90’s paved the way for me. After being around the industry, I decided that’s what I wanted to do.

The Heat Magazine: What’s your vision as an artist?

G Baby: As an artist I would like my fans to look at me as a young professional who worked hard to get where I am today. I want people to know my work all over the United States.

The Heat Magazine: What’s the title of your hottest single?

G Baby: The title of my hottest single is ”Get it Girl”. It’s a new version. It’s taking off on radio. My inspiration behind the remix is to let the ladies on their grind know to get it by any means.

The Heat Magazine: What separates you from other female artists?

G Baby: I’m not trying to be like any other artist. My flow is natural and laid back. I keep it 100.

The Heat Magazine: What are some of your hobbies?

G Baby: Some of my hobbies are playing basketball, performing, shopping, rapping, and being a wonderful mother to my 2 year old son Cash.

The Heat Magazine: Describe your style.

G Baby: My style is my own. I am myself. I’m original. I thank all older females that paved the way. I have performed at most of the clubs in New Orleans and surrounding areas.

The Heat Magazine: Tell us about some experiences between you and your father.

G Baby: My father was a hardworker and whatever he did, he gave his all. Watching him made his daughter want to grind even harder and respect the hustle.

The Heat Magazine: How has living in New Orleans impacted your life and music?

G Baby: Living here in New Orleans makes you want to strive hard, work hard to make it in life. We are at the bottom of the map and some people feel that way about New Orleans people.

The Heat Magazine: Do you feel any pressure to walk in your father’s shoes as an artist?

G Baby: No, but I am thankful my father opened up doors for me.

The Heat Magazine: Education: How important is it? Did it affect your music career?

G Baby: Education is number one. Without knowledge, you have nothing. My music didn’t affect my schooling because I knew school had to come first.

The Heat Magazine: Community: How do you feel about it? How will you help?

G Baby: My community is still continuing to rebuild from Hurricane Katrina. I would like to be able to give back to the people who need it.

The Heat Magazine: Share something with your fans that only you could.

G Baby: Something I want my fans to know is to be true to yourself and keep God first. Prayers go up and blessings come down. Believe that.

For more information, contact Dion Norman at itsdevious@yahoo.com. Contact G Baby on Twitter @ https://mobile.twitter.com/G_Baby_4life

For booking contact 225-933-6716. Additional information contact @dreammgmt on Twitter.

 

New Internet Radio Show:THE HOT BOY RADIO SHOW by DJ Cise HD

Friday, October 5th, 2012

Tune in and check out raw music and latest hits.   Renowned producer/deejay Cise launches a new show in conjunction with KCRR radio owned by Charlie Martin.  Online radio show such as this is a big victory for New Orleans artist and rap industry within the Crescent City.

Choppin’ It Up With D.J. Slash (Part 2)

Monday, April 2nd, 2012

Check out the rest of the interview with D.J. Slash – we pick up with him speaking on violent crime in New Orleans:


The Heat Magazine: What’s your point of view on violence in New Orleans?

D.J. Slash: It’s out of hand and it’s self genocide within our own communities. No amount of police presence will curb the problems of inferior education systems, poverty, unemployment, the so called war on drugs and effects of Willie Lynchism.

The Heat Magazine: The Heat understands you are a true hip hop enthusiast, how does that affect you as a deejay/producer?

D.J. Slash: A Producer brings out the best in an artist. So, I look to bring out the best in myself whenever I’m at a house party, seafood broil, family reunion, on stage, or crafting beats from a sample or an original composition.

The Heat Magazine: Do you agree or disagree with the over saturation of self produced and self engineered music releases by young artists?

D.J. Slash: I disagree, but the best way to learn is from failure.

The Heat Magazine: What’s your take on relationships and being in show business?

D.J. Slash: Whomever you’re in a relationship with has to fully overstand what their getting into and the person they”re dealing with. Me personally, I don’t feel the need to whip my feet with that, to get in or through the door.

The Heat Magazine:Where are you originally from?

D.J. Slash:I was born in the city of lost angels and moved back to Louisiana when I was 4 years old. I had family from the 7th, 9th, 3rd and 1.5 wards. I was raised on the West Bank and DJ’d on both sides of the river.

The Heat Magazine: What are your other hobbies?

D.J. Slash: Basketball, Tennis, Volleyball, reading African American History and chess.

The Heat Magazine: What’s your favorite dish?

D.J. Slash: Chicken, crawfish & shrimp fettucini or baked fish.

The Heat Magazine: If you could inspire change musically, what would be one of the main areas of focus?

D.J. Slash: The music, I try to bring more feeling and being soulful into what I do. A more organic a breathable type music.

The Heat Magazine: What’s your favorite piece of music gear?

D.J. Slash: My ASR-10

The Heat Magazine: Do you play any instruments?

D.J. Slash: Drums, Bass & Keyboards.

The Heat Magazine: Any other things you want to share with our readers?

D.J. Slash: I have music posted on www.myspace.com/ADJNAMEDSLASH,www.SoundCloud.com/ADJNAMEDSLASH,

www.facebook/D.J.SLASH/. For Booking or Production information, contact me at 504.491.0660. PEACE and Blessings, GOD Loves!

For more information contact Dion Norman at itsdevious@yahoo.com. You can check out Part 1 of the interview with D.J. Slash here: http://theheatmag.com/choppin-it-up-with-d-j-slash-part-1/

Getting to Know Mista Meana of Partners N Crime

Sunday, March 4th, 2012

Life has a way of causing humans to perceive each other in ways that are sometimes a bit off centered.  In the entertainment field, it is quite a challenge to distinguish the true character of a star.  Due to the mysterious element that constantly grows as an artist reaches higher heights, some media companies and lay citizens often create their own definition of who an artist really is.  Detrimental or not, the buzz keeps spreading.  Generalizations and stereotypes continue and some questions remain unanswered.  The Heat Magazine places great enthusiasm on delivering in-depth interviews which accentuate the “realism” in the stars that share their business endeavors with us.  We had an opportunity to build a stronger relationship with Mr. Meana and get a closer look at his life, journey, and upcoming music.  With enormous success as one half of the acclaimed rap group, Partners -N- Crime, The Heat wanted to see what was on Meana’s mind and agenda.

The Heat Magazine: What’s your latest work that we can look forward to?

Mista Meana: Well my latest work is titled “WHO SAY I CANT RAP”.  It consists of 24 songs.   It is giving my audience a clear side of who I am as MISTA MEANA and no PNC haven’t broke up. (laughing out loud)

The Heat Magazine: What can we expect from, ‘Who Say I Cant Rap’?

Mista Meana: On this project you can expect my views on life as I see it from all levels: street, spiritual, clever, and witty side. I have a song with my 10 year old daughter AMARI on a song called “ROCK WIT US”. I also got my HITZ INTERNATIONAL fam on board. Outside of that I have JUVENILE on my single track with this up and coming star WHIT BANKS. It’s a well rounded mixtape but people that have heard it say that  it should be an album.

The Heat Magazine: As a member of Partners N Crime, how have you guys been able to remain successful and grow musically?

Mista Meana: Well me  and Kango are like brothers and we always put God first in all our endeavors. We respect each others boundaries and we allow each other their own space to create.

The Heat Magazine: Who inspires you as an artist?
Mista Meana: Any artist that’s CREATIVE and DIFFERENT. I love creativity straight up!!!!!!!

The Heat Magazine:
Since we’re on creativity, What’s your favorite dish?
Mista Meana: Red beans and rice with baked chicken (you know I gotta throw the chicken in it lol) and some fresh veggies.  BAM!
The Heat Magazine: How do you feel about education?
Mista Meana: Education is big because knowing is half the battle. The more you LEARN the more you GROW, education ain’t something just for our kids. It’s something we all should continue to seek. REMEMBER knowledge is power people.
The Heat Magazine: What’s your take on relationships and the music business?
Mista Meana: Well this MUSIC BUSINESS is built off RELATIONSHIPS. In this business today: who you know that they know so we can get this done. “BUSINESS” in a nutshell and RELATIONSHIPS make that happen.  BAM (laughing out loud)
The Heat Magazine: What advice would you give upcoming artists?
Mista Meana: Grind and stay FOCUSED on the prize and remember to put God first before moving. Try to continue to move forward even through all rejects, but remain POSITIVE throughout your STRUGGLES and you can make this a career.
The Heat Magazine: How do you feel about the current state of the music industry?
Mista Meana: I love where the music business is right now.  I didn’t a year ago, because I didn’t fully understand the change the business took when they left analog and went digital. But now that I overstand the nature of the business,  I can move much better now and so can any artist that is dedicated to making this out of a career.
The Heat Magazine: What makes Mista Meana so unique?

Mista Meana: I’mma  realist, I stand on what I believe to be real or what you would call reality.  I seek the truth and stand behind it and let that be my armor and God be my shield.

The Heat Magazine: Where are you from?

Mista Meana: I’m from my mothers womb (laughing out loud), but I claim HOLLYGROVE home of the best RAPPERS and you read it right RAPPERS with a “S”. (laughing out loud)
The Heat Magazine: What’s the biggest lesson you have learned in life or in music?

Mista Meana: That everything you see ain’t always what it is. Remember LIFE is the teacher we are just STUDENTS  in the class. And MUSIC is my LIFE.  It lets my voice LIVE FOREVER.

The Heat Magazine: I understand that you spend a lot of time in the studio and handling business affairs with HITZ International, what’s in the future for you as an executive?

Mista Meana: To make every ARTIST I work with MILLIONAIRES and more. More meaning becoming the best people they can BE.
The Heat Magazine: How do you feel about the New Orleans Saints?
Mista Meana: I’m FOREVER  a SAINTS FAN PERIOD. WHODAT4LYFE!
The Heat Magazine:
How important is having balance in life?
Mista Meana:
Balance is harmony when dealing with LIFE because everything in your life needs attention or it dies.  The more you put on your plate, the more you gotta digest.  Then you wonder why you have heartburn. (Laughing out loud)
The Heat Magazine:
With the latest surge of violence in New Orleans, tell us how you feel about it.
Mista Meana:
MURDER IS BAD FOR BUSINESS. It’s BAD for our NEIGHBORHOODS, It’s BAD for our FAMILIES, It’s BAD for our PEOPLE as a WHOLE. If we learn to HATE the right things like I HATE MURDER, then and only then will this MURDER SPIRIT STOP. We must COMMAND it to not ASK it to.
The Heat Magazine:
What’s your definition of a group and loyalty?
Mista Meana:
A group is FAMILY. It’s two or more people sharing the EXACT same vision. It’s like they see themselves as one. Loyalty is a given if you plan to be a GROUP.
The Heat Magazine:
As a family man, tell us about some of your proud moments.
Mista Meana:

Meeting my beautiful wife and the births of all my wonderful daughters.  GOD is GOOD ALL  OF THE TIME.
Mista Meana’s mixtape is scheduled to be released March 21st.  The Heat Magazine will provide more information in the near future.
For more information concerning this article, contact Dion Norman at itsdevious@yahoo.com.
For more information on Mista Meana, contact him @MRMEANA on Twitter or MRMEANA504@GMAIL.COM.


Louisiana Industry Professionals Discuss Music Business

Thursday, February 23rd, 2012

In an industry that changes more than the weather, The Heat Magazine wanted to enlighten artists and music business stakeholders with pertinent information.  A superficial glance  at the music industry can deceive an upcoming artist or company.  The Heat Magazine realizes the importance in educating artists.

One of the first issues addressed in this discussion concerns copyrighting and publishing. It is imperative that all music and lyrics are copyrighted through the Library of Congress.  Copyrights protect an artist from infringement by other artists, companies, and it also helps identify owners and songwriters of a particular tune.  Although a song is copyrighted once recorded, it has to be legally copyrighted using the correct forms.

A buzz word in the music industry is publishing.  Publishing deals with mechanical, performance, and sheet music royalties.  The songwriters can collect upfront monies as well as semester payments based on the magnitude of a song.  This can be managed by publishing companies ASCAP and BMI and a publisher.  An artist has to register as a songwriter,  and a company as a publisher.  This enables an artist and a company to collect owed royalties.  For example, if a motion picture uses an artist’s song in a film, royalties are owed by the film company to the artists and other co-owners of the publishing rights on that song.  If another artist uses a portion of your song or creates a cover, then royalties are due to the artist and publisher.  This is a streamlined example but the artist  can receive money anytime another entity uses or makes money with his/her song or portions of it.  Royalties can be collected from record sales, radio/video play, club performances, and sheet music.

The Heat Magazine hopes this summary helps upcoming artists and companies.  The next subjects were covered in the following interview:

The Heat Magazine: How important are email blasts?

LaJoan of Dream Management

LaJoan  of Dream Management: Eblasts are very important. It’s the driving force that spreads your music worldwide to different D.J.s and helps start fan bases in other cities and states. Eblasts are respected more by D.J.’s.  They rather get it sent to them that way instead of artists filling up their inbox.

The Heat Magazine: How important is artist management?

LaJoan  of Dream Management: Management is important because it takes the everyday stress of the music business off the artist. I think everyone needs good management to help develop plans, marketing & promotional strategies, make phone calls and take care of other needs the artist has. Having proper management can open many doors that you may not otherwise have access to.

For more information, contact dreammgmt@gmail.com

The Heat Magazine: How important is a publicist?

Arlene Culpepper: As music artists, you need the world to know your particular brand. In order to achieve that, you need press, particularly a social media buzz, including articles regarding your work. Publicists can help brand you and get your art out to the world.

Arlene Culpepper-Assistant Editor of The Heat Magazine/Publicist

The Heat Magazine: How important is the D.J.?

Original Ice Mike 1200: Well the DJ is certainly one of the most important people to an artist.  The DJ is the soundtrack to the good times in the life of party-goers. If an artist makes a record that is so hot it withstands the test of time, the DJ is the one that is stitching that song in the memory of the people in that time of their lives.

The Heat Magazine: How important is a producer?

Ice Mike 1200-Producer

Original Ice Mike 1200: The producer is probably the most important of all in the career moments and recordings of an artist.  It’s not just making the beat. That is the music writer but the producer is the one who will not only pick or make the music track,  but who delivers the final product. The way a song comes across from the left and right speaker.  Its dynamic ability and spectrum.  Sometimes a producer can be hired by an artist to give that artist the type of songs the artist may know from the producer’s success and the artist may begin to dive into telling the producer what to do in a production and yet fall upon the same average wave of success as they were already at. It’s a factor of not letting their producer do what he was hired for.

When choosing a producer, it must be someone you can have faith in with your job. Otherwise an artist may very well see others achieve more success from the same producer. Techniques in recording,  pulling out the best in an artist, or stopping an artist from overusing their talent are all the call of a producer. The object is to have an undeniable music work before any person outside of a studio hears it. If a DJ has to say it is not mixed right, or an A&R has to say it takes too long to get to the good part,or if a consumer has to say, Why isn’t loud like I heard it in concert, 9 times out of ten you just lost one for good, who would have played it, signed it, or bought it! Production is a craft not just a title.

For more information, contact icemike1200@yahoo.com.

The Heat Magazine applauds the panelists for sharing valuable knowledge concerning the complex music business.  The entertainment industry is much more than singing, dancing, and rapping.

For more information, contact Dion Norman at itsdevious@yahoo.com. https://www.facebook.com/profile.php?id=1455661841