Posts Tagged ‘20th century’

First Marijuana Vending Machines Go Live In Seattle

Thursday, February 5th, 2015

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Weed history is being made in Seattle: the first vending machines to dispense marijuana flower buds debuted Tuesday.

The machines, called ZaZZZ, are being placed in medical pot dispensaries, which helps to verify customer’s age and identity since medical marijuana cards are required to enter the centers, said Greg Patrick, a spokesman for the maker of ZaZZZ, American Green.

Though vending machines appeared for the first time in Colorado last year, those sold only edibles, or cannabis-infused foods, and not the plant’s flower buds that are so often associated with smoking pot.

“It’s historic, there’s just no other way to state it. We saw the repeal of prohibition in the early 20th century and the mark that made on our country and the companies that did it right,” Patrick said. “We’re in that stage. This will only happen once in our country’s history, the repeal of this prohibition.”

The machines have a touchscreen where buyers can make orders, play video games and read medical information about the products. They swipe their medical marijuana IDs or driver’s licenses to make sure they can legally purchase the goods and must pay in cash or bitcoin since the federal government doesn’t allow debit or credit cards to be used in the sale of marijuana.

Like machines that dispense soda or snacks, ZaZZZ intends to speed up the distribution for those who don’t want to wait in a line at the dispensary.

Judge Says 1944 Execution Of 14-Year-Old Boy Was Wrong

Thursday, December 18th, 2014

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More than 70 years after South Carolina sent a 14-year-old black boy to the electric chair in the killings of two white girls in a segregated mill town, a judge threw out the conviction, saying the state committed a great injustice.

George Stinney was arrested, convicted of murder in a one-day trial and executed in 1944 – all in the span of about three months and without an appeal. The speed in which the state meted out justice against the youngest person executed in the United States in the 20th century was shocking and extremely unfair, Circuit Judge Carmen Mullen wrote in her ruling Wednesday.

“I can think of no greater injustice,” Mullen wrote.

The girls, ages 7 and 11, were beaten badly in the head with an iron railroad spike in the town of Alcolu in Clarendon County, about 45 miles southeast of Columbia, authorities said. A search by dozens of people found their bodies several hours later.

Investigators arrested Stinney, saying witnesses saw him with the girls as they picked flowers. He was kept away from his parents, and authorities later said he confessed.

His supporters said he was a small, frail boy so scared that he said whatever he thought would make the authorities happy. They said there was no physical evidence linking him to the deaths. His executioners noted the electric chair straps didn’t fit him, and an electrode was too big for his leg.

During a two-day hearing in January, Mullen heard from Stinney’s surviving brother and sisters, someone involved in the search and experts who questioned the autopsy findings and Stinney’s confession. Most of the evidence from the original trial was gone and almost all the witnesses were dead.

It took Mullen nearly four times as long to issue her ruling as it took in 1944 to go from arrest to execution.

Stinney’s case has long been whispered in civil rights circles in South Carolina as an example of how a black person could be railroaded by a justice system during the Jim Crow era where the investigators, prosecutors and juries were all white.

The case received renewed attention because of a crusade by textile inspector and school board member George Frierson. Armed with a binder full of newspaper articles and other evidence, he and a law firm believed the teen represented everything that was wrong with South Carolina during the era of segregation.

Frierson said he heard about the judge’s decision from a co-worker. He had to attend a school board meeting later in the day, so the news hadn’t sunk in yet.

“When I get home, I’m going to get on my knees and thank the Lord Almighty for being so good and making sure justice prevailed,” Frierson said.

Attorneys argued that Stinney should get a new trial, but Mullen went a step further by vacating Stinney’s conviction. Her 29-page order included references to the 1931 Scottsboro Boys case in Alabama, where nine black teens were convicted of raping two white women. Eight of them were sentenced to death.

The convictions were eventually overturned before the teens went to the death chamber and the charges were dropped. Mullen noted Stinney did not even get the consideration of an appeal.

The judge was careful to say her ruling doesn’t apply to other families who felt their relatives were discriminated against.

“The extraordinary circumstances discussed herein simply do not apply in most cases,” Mullen wrote.

HEAT MUSIC ANALYSIS FEATURE: Mystikal Pays Homage To The Godfather of Soul with single, Hit Me

Friday, August 15th, 2014

Mystikal Pays Homage To The Godfather of Soul with single, Hit Me

Elements of hip hop represent a synthesis at its best. The way of life we love to bask in is a scaffold starting with archetypical musicians that were born in the 19th and 20th century. Although naysayers sometimes attempt to shun the foundational fathers of African American urban music, it’s merely an impossibility to separate the model embedded within us from the earliest soul and funk records.
James Brown, an American icon and trendsetter truly earned his moniker, “The Godfather Of Soul”.
Years later below the Mason-Dixon Line, New Orleans gave birth to “The Black Prince Of The South”.
So what’s the point?
The energy level first seen in our legendary superstar Brown manifested within “the man right chea”: Mystikal. His unique voice accompanied by New Orleans heavyweight producers Cise (Precise) and KLC fused smoothly with his repetitive ability to leave listeners and audiences in awe with catchy, comical tongue-twisting lyrics.
After years of success starting with Big Boy Records and No Limit Records, Mystikal is back on the scene.
So what’s this article about?
Mystikal’s ability to not only indirectly emulate the “Godfather of Soul” while still maintaining his uniqueness and originality, but his accountability as a creative. If one is really a hip hop connoisseur, then he will always pay homage to the roots of his craft.
Mystikal does a great job in representing and honoring the late James Brown with a KLC produced single, “Hit Me,” earning him a spot on the Rolling Stone Top 100 songs list of 2013.
The Heat Magazine wanted to point out this foreshadowing single as the world gets a closer look at the life of James Brown in the newly released blockbuster film, Get On Up. Be sure to check out the film and educate yourself on Brown who was a gem in American Music.
Check out Mystikal on Hit Me with the link below:
Mystikal-Hit Me
http://mixmatters.com/songs/mystikal:-hit-me

Is this James Brown reincarnated? Well James Brown did say he can “Dig Rappin'”

Gameplay Surfaces From Cancelled Batman Game

Thursday, March 1st, 2012

You may be asking yourself, “What exactly am I looking at here?” Well, to answer your question, you are watching lost footage from a prototype game called Gotham by Gaslight. Erm….wait, before we get too far into this. Lets take a step back with some back story on Gotham by Gaslight so, for the people who aren’t familiar with it, will understand why the cancelation of this game saddens me to no end.

Gotham by Gaslight was the first of what DC comics came to call the “Elseworld” series. In the Elseworld series DC heroes were placed in time periods that were not their own and have to deal with the problems of that time period. In Batman’s case he was sent to the late 19th early 20th century Europe. Think of it as sort of a steampunk Batman game. Sounds awesome right? It was Batman’s job to hunt down and stop Jack the Ripper. Gotham by Gaslight is a solid comic, held up by many comic readers as one of the best DC comics of all time.

Now back to the game… Developers Day 1 Studio (who brought us the F.3.A.R. series) started development on Batman:GBG and planned to release it on PS3 and 360 sometime between 2009 and 2010, but upon pitching the idea, producers THQ turned them down for funding. So, without funding for the game Day 1 Studio eventually canned the game.